Tag: logcabin

Unraveled Wednesday’s Knitting and Reading 16

Hello, Friends! I’m still here. Still knitting, reading, teaching, doing each next thing. As usual on Wednesdays, I’m rushing to get everything ready for my marathon teaching day on Thursday, but I did want to pop in for Unraveled Wednesday.

The log cabin squares continue to be every bit as wonderful to knit now that I’m on square seventeen as they were on square one. I’ve started thinking of them as my portable happy place. I might have to knit them forever.

On the reading front, I picked up Exit West by Mohsin Hamid and Don’t Let Go by Harlan Coban at the airport. Exit West has a fascinating set up and some crazy good writing. It is unusual in that there is a significant piece of fantasy—doors opening to other places on the planet—that guides everything in the plot, but this is the only fantasy element in the story. I like my fiction set firmly in the real world, so it was interesting to notice how this single fantastic element affected my level of interest in the book. The story takes a hard look at communities and borders and things like what it means to be a native and a migrant. It was good enough that I’d definitely read something else by Hamid.

Don’t Let Go is the first of Harlan Coban’s books I’ve read. I regularly see his name listed alongside other writers whose books I enjoy, but for some reason it took needing a book to read in the airport and running across this one to make me actually start something by him. Don’t Let Go was good! It wasn’t life changing by any means, but it was a well-plotted, fast-paced, entertaining read.

The other book on my mind these days is Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilyich.* Holy moly. I’m teaching it to twenty-year-olds who are pretty sure they’ve seen it all, and even they are blown away. Apparently, after reading it near the end of his life, Maupassant said: “I realize that everything I have done now was to no purpose, and that my ten volumes are worthless.” I totally get it.

Check out what everyone else is knitting and reading on this Unraveled Wednesday over at As Kat Knits!

 

 

*The Peter Carson translation is my favorite.

Who knew the lizard wanted to be a log all along? 19

A long, long time ago–back in the Fall of 2006 to be exact–Laura Aylor introduced the Lizard Ridge blanket to the world. Knitty published the pattern, and it instantly became THE blanket in my mind. I adore knitting with Noro Kureyon, and the way the Lizard Ridge worked to show off the gorgeous colors of the yarn and brought everything together into such a magnificent whole absolutely undid me. That picture of the blanket draped over the seafoam rocking chair, on what I presume is the “Ridge,” has been in my head ever since.

I started my own version sometime in the distant past and loved the yarn, loved the squares, loved the whole idea except that I did not love knitting all those short rows. Four or five squares of the blanket and a box full of beautiful Kureyon have been sitting in my closet ever since. Or I should say they, had been sitting in my closet until the Fringe and Friends Logalong started percolating in my brain.

I tentatively knit one Log Cabin square with the Kureyon, and guess what. Potato chips! You canNOT knit just one. My few squares of Lizard Ridge:

Quickly became a pile of Log Cabin:

I found Kay Gardiner and Ann Shayne’s Fussy Cuts Blanket Pattern, and I was off.

All I want to do is knit log cabin squares. I can’t explain it.

At first I wondered if the picking up stitches part would be a drag, but I read this post by the Yarn Harlot on “picking up and knitting” stitches and “picking up” stitches and knitting, and I never looked back. I might even say that the picking up business is one of my favorite parts of the whole process. It’s so easy to do once you know what you’re looking for and so satisfying!

I have become someone who knits log cabin squares all the time. Couch, car, classroom, bathroom, outside with the dogs, at the dinner table, standing at the dryer waiting for the clothes to dry, planting trees, falling asleep, getting dressed, standing in line, I knit them. I knit them ALL THE TIME.

The closest anyone has come to capturing the whole thing is Karen Templar in her February 15th blog post. She is talking specifically about her wonderful Log Cabin Mitts here, but I believe the idea holds true for all kinds of log cabin projects:

I know it seems like I’m just knitting Log Cabin Mitts here, but that’s not how it feels to me. There’s something primordial about it. I’m having a reaction. Succumbing to an addiction. Scratching some itch that I don’t quite understand and am enjoying more than I can describe. I mean, the knitting is really fun, and the finished mitts are super cool and useful and feel good on my hands, so on that level they’re an obvious delight. There’s also something almost subversive about it, since I add onto them in life’s interstices — knitting a patch in a stolen moment here and there . . . . And when I’m not knitting them, I have intense withdrawal. I literally dream about them, and my hands yearn for them when I’m doing other things. I can’t think of a parallel experience.

As much as I did not enjoy knitting the Lizard Ridge short rows, THAT is how much I love knitting Log Cabin squares. More than that. It is seriously all I want to do.

All the time.

 

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Ohhhh, the weather outside . . . 20

Is glorious!!!

I think I’m going to make it. Only sixty-two bajillion papers left to grade, and my first semester back in the classroom will be in the books. My last class was Thursday, and I have to tell you–my subconscious must have taken that as license to KNIT!!! I’ve been shamelessly ignoring my responsibilities and knitting away on all sorts of odds and ends all weekend.

The picture above is the tiny front of a cardigan for a new bundle of preciousness I’ll get to see for the first time over the holidays. The cute is killing me. Pictures soon.

There’s also my Inlet cardigan. Little problem with that one. I finally finished up all the pieces, gave it a good soak, and set to work pinning it out on my blocking board.

 While I was futzing around trying to get the fronts to line up, I realized that something wasn’t right.

Ugh. At some point during the craziness of the semester, I must have gone to finish up that front left side and temporarily lost my mind. Why in the world did I decrease at the top on the armhole side?? I’m trying to focus on the fact that this is knit bottom up, so fixing it shouldn’t take long. Still . . .

The other thing that’s been on my mind is the Fringe and Friends New-Year Knitalong. It’s a Logalong! I’ve wanted to try log cabin-ing forever, and I absolutely love a good knit along. I’m pretty sure I’m going to be on board for this.

Karen Templer recommended Ann Shayne and Kay Gardiner’s Log Cabin Field Guide as a good starting point. It explains the basics of how the log cabin construction works and gives you a few variations to try. I enjoyed knitting this little dish cloth for practice.

Kay Gardiner is hosting a discussion board where all sorts of fun ideas are floating around. Plus, Karen Templer has been regularly featuring ideas for log cabin projects on the Fringe Association blog. It’s the images at the top of this post that have really captured my imagination. I’m thinking of doing a throw like this in a log cabin version with some combination of speckledy yarns. Maybe. There are so many delicious possibilities. Anyone else thinking of joining in?

That pile of papers isn’t going to grade itself, so I should get going. I’ll just close with a few pictures of the amazing weather we’ve been having. On Thursday Paul and I took Django for a walk, and the world looked like this.

By yesterday, we had this!

I love, love, love the first snow of the year, and this one has been spectacular.

Here’s hoping the weather is nice where you are and, most importantly, that there is lots of knitting in the forecast! Be well, my friends.

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