Posts for : February 2018

Who knew the lizard wanted to be a log all along? 19

A long, long time ago–back in the Fall of 2006 to be exact–Laura Aylor introduced the Lizard Ridge blanket to the world. Knitty published the pattern, and it instantly became THE blanket in my mind. I adore knitting with Noro Kureyon, and the way the Lizard Ridge worked to show off the gorgeous colors of the yarn and brought everything together into such a magnificent whole absolutely undid me. That picture of the blanket draped over the seafoam rocking chair, on what I presume is the “Ridge,” has been in my head ever since.

I started my own version sometime in the distant past and loved the yarn, loved the squares, loved the whole idea except that I did not love knitting all those short rows. Four or five squares of the blanket and a box full of beautiful Kureyon have been sitting in my closet ever since. Or I should say they, had been sitting in my closet until the Fringe and Friends Logalong started percolating in my brain.

I tentatively knit one Log Cabin square with the Kureyon, and guess what. Potato chips! You canNOT knit just one. My few squares of Lizard Ridge:

Quickly became a pile of Log Cabin:

I found Kay Gardiner and Ann Shayne’s Fussy Cuts Blanket Pattern, and I was off.

All I want to do is knit log cabin squares. I can’t explain it.

At first I wondered if the picking up stitches part would be a drag, but I read this post by the Yarn Harlot on “picking up and knitting” stitches and “picking up” stitches and knitting, and I never looked back. I might even say that the picking up business is one of my favorite parts of the whole process. It’s so easy to do once you know what you’re looking for and so satisfying!

I have become someone who knits log cabin squares all the time. Couch, car, classroom, bathroom, outside with the dogs, at the dinner table, standing at the dryer waiting for the clothes to dry, planting trees, falling asleep, getting dressed, standing in line, I knit them. I knit them ALL THE TIME.

The closest anyone has come to capturing the whole thing is Karen Templar in her February 15th blog post. She is talking specifically about her wonderful Log Cabin Mitts here, but I believe the idea holds true for all kinds of log cabin projects:

I know it seems like I’m just knitting Log Cabin Mitts here, but that’s not how it feels to me. There’s something primordial about it. I’m having a reaction. Succumbing to an addiction. Scratching some itch that I don’t quite understand and am enjoying more than I can describe. I mean, the knitting is really fun, and the finished mitts are super cool and useful and feel good on my hands, so on that level they’re an obvious delight. There’s also something almost subversive about it, since I add onto them in life’s interstices — knitting a patch in a stolen moment here and there . . . . And when I’m not knitting them, I have intense withdrawal. I literally dream about them, and my hands yearn for them when I’m doing other things. I can’t think of a parallel experience.

As much as I did not enjoy knitting the Lizard Ridge short rows, THAT is how much I love knitting Log Cabin squares. More than that. It is seriously all I want to do.

All the time.

 

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Unraveled Wednesday 7

Hi, Friends! I’m checking in for Unraveled Wednesday. It’s felt like I was one of the few people on the planet who hadn’t read All the Light We Cannot See, but no more. I’ve got just a few pages left, and I now understand why my mom and my aunt and my friends have been talking about it so much. It’s a great read!

I kept meaning to pick it up, but something in the back of my mind kept telling me the plot seemed contrived. I couldn’t have been more wrong. The blind girl and the model making father and the radio boy genius are presented and brought together so beautifully by the author that the narrative that results in their meeting seems like the most natural thing in the world. Plus, there are all kinds of fascinating details about life in occupied France during World War II, and there’s a mystery that plays out involving a hidden diamond. I absolutely recommend this book.

On the knitting front, I’ve cast on for Caffeinated. This is my first try at brioche, so I had a couple of false starts, but now that I’ve got the hang of it, I’m really enjoying it. Caffeinated includes both brioche and double knitting. I can’t wait to see how they come together!

I’ve got a ton of work to do to prepare for my marathon work Thursday, so I’ll keep this brief. I hope everyone is making it through the last of winter okay and getting in LOTS OF KNITTING!!